It’s not just a signature, people take to the streets as they did against Collor and Dilma, says Bacha

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It’s not just a signature, people take to the streets as they did against Collor and Dilma, says Bacha

One of the signatories of the “Letter to Brazilians and Brazilians in Defense of the Democratic State of Law”, economist Edmar Bacha says that the immense volume of adhesions to the movement shows that it is not a group of half a dozen elite people concerned with the matter in the country.

“It’s not just people who want to sign from home. The concern is such that people take to the streets, as they were against Collor, as they were against Dilma”, says Bacha, who was president of IBGE, BNDES, as well as a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters, founder of the Casa das Garças institute and one of the authors of the Real Plan.

While some associations representing the private sector are still evaluating whether or not to adhere to the manifestos that exploded after the recent attacks by President Jair Bolsonaro (PL) on the polls, Bacha recognizes that there may be fear of retaliation, but makes the caveat that “compared to the fear for what the end of democracy poses, a higher value rises”.

What is your opinion on the importance of these demonstrations in defense of democracy, especially the business? The reaction shows. There are thousands of signatures. I never saw it. It’s not just a handful of elite people who are concerned about the matter.

There are many people in Brazil who really share this concern with the threat that Bolsonaro makes to electronic voting machines, especially because of the support that the Defense Minister gives him, which creates an unusual situation.

We thought we had completely overcome this phase of military pronouncements, things that had remained there in the 1950s, 1960s. The military does not pronounce itself on civil issues.

We have already seen, in the past year, other large manifestations of elites concerned with the management of the pandemic, environmental concerns and even with the electoral system. But the president continues with the attacks on the polls. These manifestations have practical? We will see. The 11th will have a street thing. I think there will be something that is not just people signing at home.

There will be an important street demonstration to show that it is not really about half a dozen people. And it’s not just people who want to sign from home. The concern is such that people take to the streets, as they did against Collor, as they did against Dilma.

We’re talking about this kind of thing: people taking to the streets and signing a manifesto to defend an extremely expensive cause.

Last year, there was noise around a related, albeit less assertive, manifesto at Fiesp, in which Caixa and Banco do Brasil, through the now ex-president of Caixa, Pedro Guimarães, threatened to leave Febraban if the federation sign. Is there a fear of retaliation when signing this type of position in the private sector? I think that now, with such a strong demonstration, it shows that fear always exists, but compared to the fear that the end of democracy poses, a higher value arises.

Is there any fear that the signing could be interpreted as support for Lula, given that polls are showing them both in the lead? I think the letter was very careful to show that it was not a political-electoral manifestation. It is a demonstration in defense of institutions, specifically the higher courts. It has no candidate option feature.

And the third way? Has the prospect of strengthening a third party Name? I am excited about the prospect of strengthening the political party of Simone Tebet’s candidacy. The last leg is missing, which is the choice of vice or vice.

But it’s going better than we expected, in terms of unification around Simone these forces that two months ago were so divided.

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