Scientists claim to have found a mysterious cell in humans – What is it for?

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A type of immune cell that first appears in the uterus is claimed by scientists to have been identified.

According to livescience, these mysterious cells, known as B-1 cells, were first spotted in mice in the 1980s, according to a 2018 review in The Journal of Immunology.

They appear in the early stages of development of mice, while still in the womb and produce various antibodies when activated.

Some of these antibodies attach to the mouse’s own cells and help remove dead or ready-to-die cells from the body.

Activated B-1 cells also produce antibodies that act as a first line of defense against pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria.

These cells appear early in the development of mice, inside the uterus, and produce various antibodies when activated. Some of them attach to mouse cells and help clear dead and half-dead cells from the body. Activated B-1 cells also produce antibodies that act as a first line of defense against pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria.

After the discovery of cells B-1 in mice, Researchers reported in 2011 that they had found similar cells in humans, but these results were not accepted as conclusive evidence.

Now, a new study, published Thursday in Science, reveals conclusive evidence that B-1 cells also occur in early human development, within the first and second trimesters.

«I think these are the clearest facts so far that humans also carry B-1 cells“, Said Dr. Nicole Baumgarth, a professor at UC Davis Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, did not participate in the new study.

In theory, these cells may play a critical role in early development, and by studying them further, scientists could improve their understanding of what a healthy human immune system looks like, Baumgarth told Live Science.

The new research was published along with three others recently conducted by the Human Cell Atlas (HCA) consortium – an international group focusing on the location, function and characteristics of each cell type in the human body. Together, the four studies, all published in Science on May 12, include analyzes of more than one million human cells, representing more than 500 distinct cell types with samples from more than 30 different tissues.

LIVE SCIENCE

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