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The actress Keira Knightley revealed that she was exhausted during the early years of her career as she pushed herself too hard. The 37-year-old “Pirates of the Caribbean” star felt like she was never good enough and strived for the best.

About realizing how much pressure she put on herself in the early years of her career, the actress said in an interview with “Harper’s Bazaar”: “I was incredibly hard on myself. I was never good enough. I was completely single-minded. I was so ambitious. I was always trying to get better and better, which is an exhausting way to live your life. I’m in awe of my 22-year-old self, because I’d like a little more of him back,” she said.

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The actress rose to fame starring in the 2002 film ‘Bend It Like Beckham’. She continued: ‘I had quite a rough transition into adulthood, a crash landing due to fame at a very young age. I was never comfortable with the publicity part. I always had to be careful what I did and what I said. They judged me for what I showed,” she explained in the interview.

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On trying to expand her career after her role in Pirates of the Caribbean, the actress noted: “That particular character, Elizabeth Swann, was the object of everyone’s lust. So the roles after that were to try to get away from that. I didn’t know how to express it. I felt like I was trapped in something I didn’t understand,” she added.

Keira Knightley was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance as Elizabeth Bennet in the 2005 period film Pride & Prejudice, and was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Joan Clarke in The Imitation Game” of 2014. The actress has been married since 2013 to the British musician, James Righton, and they have two little girls.

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As for raising children, the actress noted that it took three people to do what a “full-time” parent does.

“When you hear someone say, ‘I just stay home with the kids,’ that’s not ‘just.’ That’s a huge thing’. The gravity of childcare needs to be recognized. It’s hard work, it’s vital, it’s underrated. And it’s so exhausting.”