spot_img
Thursday, December 1, 2022
HomeOpinionELSTAT: Survey on the labor market position of immigrants

ELSTAT: Survey on the labor market position of immigrants

-

- Advertisement -

People without an immigrant background show the highest percentage of higher education graduates and the lowest percentage of lower education. Conversely, second-generation immigrants have the lowest percentage of higher education and the highest percentage of lower education.

The employment rate in the country was almost the same last year for people born in Greece to Greek parents and for people born abroad (50.4% and 50.7%, respectively). In contrast, the employment rate was much lower (33.4%) for second-generation immigrants.

- Advertisement -

This results from ELSTAT’s special (ad hoc) survey on the labor market position of immigrants and their direct descendants, according to which:

From the employment situation by age groups, it appears that this difference in the employment level of second-generation immigrants is explained by the different age composition of this population category: due to the large proportion of 15-24-year-olds among second-generation immigrants, it is group with the greatest participation in education.

- Advertisement -

In the 25-44 age group, the employment rate of second-generation immigrants is almost the same as the employment rate of Greeks without an immigrant background (while it is significantly lower for those born abroad). Finally, people who were born abroad show the highest percentage of unemployed people as well as the lowest participation in education.

People without an immigrant background show the highest percentage of higher education graduates and the lowest percentage of lower education. Conversely, second-generation immigrants have the lowest percentage of higher education and the highest percentage of lower education.

It is pointed out, however, that these results are shaped by the different age structure of second-generation immigrants: a large percentage of these individuals continue their studies in the formal education system.

People without an immigrant background show the highest percentage of employment in highly skilled non-manual occupations (33.8%), while those born abroad have the lowest (13.9%). Second-generation immigrants are employed in the majority (42%) in low-skilled non-manual occupations.

Significant differences also appear in the sectoral distribution of occupations by immigrant background. The percentage of the foreign-born employed in manufacturing is almost double that of people without an immigrant background (26.4% vs. 14.4%). Second-generation immigrants are mainly employed in the trade, transport, catering and hotel sectors (55.4%), while people without an immigrant background show the highest employment rates in the primary sector and in the public administration, education, health and arts sectors .

About 9 out of 10 workers they state that they are quite or very satisfied with their profession. The satisfaction rates are similar for people with different immigration backgrounds, but it is observed that the percentage of those who say they are not satisfied is almost twice as much for people who were born abroad (10.2% vs. 6.4%). The satisfaction rates are almost identical for second-generation immigrants and for people with no immigrant background.

Similar results are also observed when it comes to dealing with discrimination in the workplace. Only 3.5% of workers stated that they have faced discrimination, but in the case of those born abroad, this percentage rises to 16.1%. The percentage of second-generation immigrants who declare themselves victims of discrimination is lower (5.7%), but almost double the corresponding percentage (2.5%) for people born in Greece, themselves and their parents.

It is observed that the level of knowledge of the Greek language is significantly correlated with the employment status and the level of education of persons born abroad. The percentage of the unemployed among people who have only a basic or elementary knowledge of the Greek language is almost double compared to that of people with a satisfactory or excellent knowledge of the language. Accordingly, the employment rate is significantly higher among people with a good knowledge of Greek.

Regarding the level of education, it is observed that the lowest level of knowledge of the Greek language generally corresponds to a lower level of education. Also, the level of knowledge of Greek is directly related to the years of residence in Greece.

If the level of knowledge of the Greek language is examined in relation to the age of arrival in Greece, it is observed that the younger the age of arrival, the better the knowledge of Greek: the percentage of people with a basic or elementary knowledge of the language is 0.7% for the people who came to Greece between 0-5 years of age, while it is more than tenfold (9.8%) for people who came 18 years or older.

Satisfactory knowledge of the language is associated with a significantly lower rate of discrimination in the workplace. One in 4 people with a basic or minimal knowledge of Greek faced some discrimination, while this applies to only 1 in 6 in the case of people with at least a satisfactory knowledge of the language. Satisfactory knowledge of the language is associated with an increased rate of attendance at Greek language courses. A significant percentage of people with a very basic knowledge of Greek (42.4%) did not attend a language course, due to the cost or non-existence of relevant courses.

Regarding the number of immigrants and their direct descendants, of the total number of people aged 15-74 who were surveyed, it is estimated that 93.1% were born in Greece and 6.8% abroad. People with an immigrant background amount to 9.5% (of which 6.8% were born abroad while 2.7% were born in Greece and one or both of their parents were abroad).

Examining the main countries of origin in combination with the year of entry into Greece, it is observed that until 1989 most immigrants came from countries with a significant presence of Greek immigrants (European countries, countries of the former USSR), while since 1989 the main source of immigration has been Albania, followed by the countries of the former USSR and the other Balkan. Since 2010, other European and Asian countries appear with an increased percentage.

The percentage of women is higher in both groups with an immigrant background, while in people who were born themselves as well as their parents in Greece, the percentages of women and men are almost equal. In terms of age, the average age of people born abroad is only slightly older than the average age of people without an immigrant background. On the contrary, the population of second-generation immigrants is much younger than the people who themselves and both their parents were born in Greece (30.2 years versus 45.9 years).

Specifically, the 35-44 age group outnumbers people born abroad, while the percentage of people aged 15-24 is particularly small. People born in Greece (and with Greek parents) are generally older. On the contrary, the population of people who were born in Greece but have at least one parent born abroad, is particularly young, as more than 70% consists of people under 35 years of age.

RES-EMP

- Advertisement -
spot_img
Kelsey
Kelsey
I have worked as a journalist for over 10 years, and my work has been featured on many different news websites. I am also an author, and my work has been published in several books. I specialize in opinion writing, and I often write about current events and controversial topics. I am a very well-rounded writer, and I have a lot of experience in different areas of journalism. I am a very hard worker, and I am always willing to put in the extra effort to get the job done.

Related articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Stay Connected

1,250FansLike
1,500FollowersFollow

Latest posts